Issue 11 Call for Submissions

by on Nov 30, 2016

This is the Official Call for Submissions for Issue 11 of Gnarled Oak, which will start in January and be an unthemed issue.

Gnarled Oak accepts poetry, prose, videos and artwork. I don’t impose rules on what is and isn’t acceptable (other than the no hate speech, no pornography one), but as a general guideline, I tend to favor shorter works, which for our purposes means poems of less than 20 lines, prose less than 1000 words, and videos less than 7 minutes long. Regarding form and style, I’m open to almost anything. Check out previous issues to get a sense of things.

I’ll be reading for Issue 11 through December 31 and plan on starting the issue the week of January 9 January 16. Please visit the Submissions page for more in-depth guidelines. I look forward to seeing what comes this way, and I hope you’ll send something and help spread the word. Thank you.

2016 Pushcart Nominations

by on Nov 29, 2016

Here are Gnarled Oak’s six Pushcart nominees for 2016 in order of appearance. I hope you’ll go back and reread them:

Ghosts of Home by Kim Mannix (from Issue 6: Cosmology)

Cosmology by Laura M. Kaminsky (from Issue 6: Cosmology)

Sister Speed Racer and the Silent Brides of Christ by Michael Whiteman-Jones (from Issue 6: Cosmology)

Worried Man Blues by Harold Whit Williams (from Issue 8: The Somnambulist’s Notebook)

Gossamer by Jeanie Tomasko (from Issue 9: Harbor, Home, Hard Love)

The Animals Are Gone by Steve Klepetar (from Issue 10: Dark Water)

Congratulations to these authors and my sincerest thanks to them and everyone who allows me the honor of publishing their work at Gnarled Oak.

Issue 10: Dark Water—Summary, Contents & Editor’s Note

by on Nov 28, 2016

gnarled_oak_cover-10Summary

Issue 10: Dark Water (Oct-Nov 2016) is an unthemed issue featuring poetry, prose, videos, and artwork from writers and artists around the world.

Read online | Read the PDF (click to read online, right-click & save-as to download)

Contents

Inkchester — Jo Waterworth

‘A Man Was Lynched by Police Yesterday’
 — Howie Good

Ocean Watch — Mary McCarthy

Crossing — Alan Perry

Dark Water — Martha Magenta

There Is a Season #2 — Steve Tomasko

Shaky Hands — Cheyenne Bilderback

still not yet done — Adjei Agyei-Baah

Jake Forgets It — Todd Mercer

on that bench — Debbie Strange

Night of the Dead — Annie Prevost

Two Years Ceased — Ann Howells

What If a Tree — Richard Weaver

One Dream Opening into Many — Marie Craven

We Sat Outside — Jean Morris

With the County — Robert Joe Stout

Inside Job — Steve Tomasko

Purple Angel Bottom — Howie Good

Warm #115 — Darren C. Demaree

@ The Limekiln State Park II — Samantha Tetangco

monsoon — Goran Gatalica

Your Shadow — Jean Morris

Shorty, the Crow — Tricia Knoll

License — Larry D. Thacker

The Animals Are Gone — Steve Klepetar

in your old backyard — Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco

a new silk scarf — Mary Kendall

love note — Christina Sng

Positive Vibration — John L. Stanizzi

Taking Off — Olivier Schopfer

Editor’s Note

I am a bit surprised that Gnarled Oak has made it to ten issues. When I launched it two years ago, I had no idea if I would even get any submissions let alone enough to publish even one issue. Needless to say, I’m thrilled that we’ve made it this far, and during this post-Thanksgiving season here in the US, let me just say how thankful I am for everyone who entrusts Gnarled Oak with their work and all who read and share this journal. My sincerest thanks.

In addition to post-Thanksgiving, it’s also post-election season here in the US. It’s been an ugly one for sure and it seems the internet has exploded with vitriol, fake news, propaganda, and poorly fact-checked memes. Fortunately, Gnarled Oak has helped keep me sane and hopefully you as well. It seems we’re navigating some dark waters indeed, something I wasn’t thinking of when I selected the title for this issue, but it seems apt on many levels.

When I started this project I wanted to add a bit of light and beauty to this little backroads corner the internet. And so we’ll continue with that project amid the ugliness around. Now more than ever. Thank you all for being a part of this.

With gratitude and thanks,

James Brush, editor
Nov 2016

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Gnarled Oak — Issue 10: Dark Water: Read onlineRead the PDF (right-click/save-as to download)

Issue 10: Call for Submissions

by on Aug 30, 2016

Here we are. It’s the Big 1-0. Gnarled Oak is heading into double digits. This is the Official Call for Submissions for Issue 10 of Gnarled Oak, which will start in October and be an unthemed issue.

Gnarled Oak accepts poetry, prose, videos and artwork. I don’t like to impose rules on what is and isn’t acceptable (other than the no hate speech, no pornography one), but as a general guideline, I tend to favor shorter works, which for our purposes means poems of less than 20 lines, prose less than 1000 words, and videos less than 7 minutes long. Regarding form and style, I’m open to almost anything. Check out previous issues to get a sense of things.

I’ll be reading for Issue 10 through September 30 and plan on starting the issue the week of October 10 (yes, Issue 10 starts on 10/10) October 17. Please visit the Submissions page for more in-depth guidelines. I look forward to seeing what comes this way, and I hope you’ll send something and help spread the word. Thank you.

Issue 9: Harbor, Home, Hard Love—Summary, Contents & Editor’s Note

by on Aug 29, 2016

gnarled_oak_cover-9Summary

Issue 9: Harbor, Home, Hard Love (Jul-Aug 2016) is an unthemed issue featuring poetry, prose, videos, and artwork from writers and artists around the world.

Read online | Read the PDF (click to read online, right-click & save-as to download)

Contents

I Am April — Tiffany Grantom

Gossamer — Jeanie Tomasko

composing for voice & breath — Scott-Patrick Mitchell

Westbound PA Turnpike — James Esch

Acutance — Jack Bedell

prairie storm — Debbie Strange

Texas Life Story, Six Words — Lisa Bubert

and if you sketched the view from here minus
 — Jeanie Tomasko

The Meeting Ran Long — Marie Craven

Multilingual — Steve Klepetar

The Elephant in the Room — Juliet Wilson

After Ekphrasis — Marie Landau

Geography of the Dream — Joan Colby

Talking You to Sleep — Margaret Holley

Sea Song — PJ Wren

Daydream — Olivier Schopfer

Moon Kisses — Kelsey May

Super Moon— Cathryn Essigner

In a Dark Room — Steve Klepetar

Once Upon a Time — Consuelo Arredondo,
 Cristina Ortiz, Ferrie = differentieel,
 Johann Mynhardt & Luis Rojas

My Cross — Chinua Ezenwa-Ohaeto

Skins — Mary McCarthy

ECT — Mary McCarthy

Ominous Dreams — Bill Waters

Only the Lonely — Marie Craven

old footbridge — Pravat Kumar Padhy

tequila sunset — Christina Sng

riddle of renewing — j.lewis

from Orchards — Marilyn McCabe

Shorts-and-long-sleeved-shirt-kinda-perfect-Sunday
 afternoon at the beach — Jeanie Tomasko

Editor’s Note

Back to school. That’s why this note and issue wrap-up is so late. Should I tell you the dog ate my work? It’s a great excuse since dogs will eat anything: paper, plastic, Legos, spatulas, curtains, coffee tables, trash. Why not the last page of this issue?

So I’m back to school and already I hear this from my students: “Writing is boring.”

My mind short circuits. This simply does not compute.

Lately, I’ve tried responding with, “Why are you writing boring things? Try writing something interesting.”

This stumps them sometimes, but I figure why not? Many of my kids act like they want me to entertain them, but maybe they should try to entertain me.

This year, I’ll tell them to try to think like writers: entertain me, inform me, persuade me. Show me your world as only you know it.

Now here we are starting the second week of school and a few at least seem willing to try. Maybe I can find a seat in the back of the classroom, sit down and learn from what they’ve got to say.

It’s what I like to do here at Gnarled Oak, and so, thank you as always for writing and reading, for sending your work and letting me publish some of it. For letting me sit in the back and learn so much. It’s always an honor, and I hope you’ve enjoyed this issue as much as I did.

And for those of you teachers, students, and parents of school and college-aged kids, best of luck to you in the new school year, and may all your dogs keep their teeth off your work.

With gratitude and thanks,

James Brush, editor
Aug 2016

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Gnarled Oak — Issue 9: Harbor, Home, Hard Love: Read onlineRead the PDF (right-click/save-as to download)

Issue 9: Call for Submissions

by on Jun 1, 2016

This is the Official Call for Submissions for Issue 9 of Gnarled Oak, which will start in July and be an unthemed issue.

Gnarled Oak accepts poetry, prose, videos and artwork. I don’t like to impose rules on what is and isn’t acceptable (other than the no hate speech, no pornography one), but as a general guideline, I tend to favor shorter works, which for our purposes means poems of less than 20 lines, prose less than 1000 words, and videos less than 7 minutes long. Regarding form and style, I’m open to almost anything. Check out previous issues to get a sense of things.

I’ll be reading for Issue 9 through June 30 and plan on starting the issue the week of July 4 July 11. Please visit the Submissions page for more in-depth guidelines. I look forward to seeing what comes this way, and I hope you’ll send something and help spread the word. Thank you.

Issue 8: The Somnambulist’s Notebook—Summary, Contents & Editor’s Note

by on May 31, 2016

gnarled_oak_cover8Summary

Issue 8: The Somnambulist’s Notebook (Apr-May 2016) is an unthemed issue featuring poetry, videos, and artwork from writers and artists around the world.

Read online | Read the PDF (click to read online, right-click & save-as to download)

Contents

longest night… — Archana Kapoor Nagpal

Ring-Around-Your-Dreams — Steve Klepetar

The Perigee Moon — Tricia Knoll

Dream of Flying — Michele S. Cornelius

The Somnambulist’s Notebook — Steve Klepetar

Joining the Lotus Eaters — Marie Craven

Making Friends with the Bear — Jo Waterworth

Pine — Arielle Lipset

The body that gleams in the depths — Luisa A. Igloria

Medieval saints could read hearts — Rebecca Valley

Sweet Insanity — Ehi’zogie Iyeomoan

Wasteland — Olivier Schopfer

Waiting — Marianne Paul

Dragon’s Breath — Mary McCarthy

Murmurations — Jennifer Hernandez

Worried Man Blues — Harold Whit Williams

Lilies of the Field — Marie Craven

Rural Road — Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco

Train — John L. Stanizzi

Homestead — Debbie Strange

high — Güliz Vural

haiku haiku hai — Marianne Paul

Boy — Casey Stein & Jamie Wimberly

Towards a Larger Physical Stoicism
 — Harold Whit Williams

Washes the Other — Todd Mercer

Winning — Jade Anouka

Dear Zion Canyon, — Carolyn Martin

Reserving Judgment
 — Laura M. Kaminski & Saddiq Dzukogi

brushstrokes — Marianne Paul

Compline — Luisa A. Igloria

Editor’s Note

Simon the Cat likes to bite me sometimes. I don’t really know why. I’m sure he has his reasons, and in the grand scheme of feline justice it all probably makes sense. I’m sure I wronged him weeks or months ago, and as with the US Supreme Court, it sometimes takes months to hand down a decision. The decision tonight: bite.

So I’m sitting here trying to come up with an editor’s note worthy of this issue, and this cat is circling my legs, accepting head scratches and sometimes going for the cheap shot. Does he know he’s going to the vet later in the week for his annual vaccinations?

Or perhaps he’s telling me that I have nothing to add here this time because this issue is so wonderful. Why mess it up, James, he’s saying.

So, I’ll follow Simon’s advice (he is on the masthead, after all) and just say thanks to everyone who submitted, read, shared, commented and enjoyed this issue. I’m probably not supposed to say this as an impartial editor, but it’s one of my favorites.

With gratitude and thanks,

James Brush, editor
May 2016

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Gnarled Oak — Issue 8: The Somnambulist’s Notebook: Read online | Read the PDF (right-click/save-as to download)

Issue 7: Dear Friends—Summary, Contents & Editor’s Note

by on Apr 8, 2016

gnarled_oak_cover-7Summary

Issue 7: Dear Friends aka “The Oldies Issue” (Mar-Apr 2016) is a special mini-issue in which contributors submitted a favorite pre-20th century poem along with a response, commentary, or creative remix.

Read online | Read the PDF (click to read online, right-click & save-as to download)

Contents

Translation of Catullus 51 — Sherry Chandler & T.R. Williams

A Description of the Morning by Jonathan Swift — Andrea Wyatt

The Sick Rose by William Blake — Patricia McGoldrick

Lift Not the Painted Veil by Percy Bysshe Shelley — Marie Craven

On Death by John Keats — Sultana Raza

There was an Old Man who supposed by Edward Lear — Olivier Schopfer

Untitled Sonnet by Alexander Smith — Laura M. Kaminski

Binsey Poplars by Gerard Manley Hopkins — Kenneth Pobo

The Old by Roden Noel — Laura M. Kaminski

Dear Friends by Edwin Arlington Robinson — Patrick G. Metoyer

Editor’s Note

This was a short issue, so I’ll keep the note short too. As I wrote in the intro, I had no idea what to expect when I put out the call for submissions back in November of last year. It took a while for these ten poems to show up in my in-box, but they were worth it. I had not read any of them before.

The responses are equally wonderful. Reader and previous-issue-contributor Joan Leotta even described it as being like a poetry course, and that’s how I came to think of it too. I never took a poetry class in college so this was a way for me to expand my horizons a bit. I hope it has done likewise for you.

With gratitude and thanks,

James Brush, editor
April 2016

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Gnarled Oak — Issue 7: Dear Friends: Read online | Read the PDF (right-click/save-as to download)

Issue 7: Dear Friends—Editor’s Note (Intro)

by on Mar 22, 2016

Welcome to Issue 7: Dear Friends aka “The Oldies Issue”. Starting today, we begin an experiment of sorts: a short issue comprised of pre-twentieth century poetry. I’d hoped people would submit a poem they love, like, or that should simply just be shared along with a short statement about or response to the poem. Creative responses intrigued me, and I had no idea what I’d get.

I was interested in “deep tracks” more than the “hits,” so the likes of Poe, Dickinson, and Shakespeare would be fine, but I wanted to avoid the high school English textbook standards since I already know them being a non-standard high school English teacher.

From a copyright standpoint, all submissions needed to be in the public domain and out of copyright, which along with a desire to explore lesser known works, led to the pre-twentieth century requirement.

What I got was what I always get from Gnarled Oak contributors… amazing work that inspires. I hope you enjoy reading this issue as much as I enjoyed putting it together, and thank you to all who submitted and made this experiment possible.

Issues 7 & 8: Call for Submissions

by on Feb 22, 2016

This is the Official Call for Submissions for Gnarled Oak‘s 7th & 8th issues. I’ve still got a few slots left for the “oldies” issue in which I’m asking people to submit a favorite pre-20th century poem along with a brief response, creative or otherwise. I’m hoping it will run in March as Issue 7, and then the next regular unthemed issue will run in April as Issue 8.

For Issue 8, Gnarled Oak accepts poetry, prose, artwork, and videos. As a general guideline, I tend to favor shorter works, which for our purposes means poems of less than 20 lines, prose less than 1000 words, and videos less than 7 minutes long. Regarding form and style, I’m open to almost anything. Check out previous issues to get a sense of things.

I’ll be reading for Issue 8 through April 1, 2016 and plan on starting the issue the week of April 11.

For the oldies issue, an experiment of sorts inspired by the weekly vintage verse feature at Autumn Sky Poetry DAILY (a fine journal, you really should check out) and my son’s love of show-and-tell. I’m interested in putting together a short issue (10-15 pieces) comprised of pre-twentieth century poetry. I’m hoping people will submit a poem they love, like, or that should simply just be shared along with a short (~200 words max.) statement about or response to the poem. Creative responses intrigue me. As do visual and even video responses.

Regarding the poems, I’m more interested in “deep tracks” than the “hits,” so the likes of Poe, Dickinson, and Shakespeare are fine and will be considered, but I’d like to try to avoid the high school English textbook standards (I already know them being a standard high school English teacher).

It is important from a copyright standpoint that all submissions be of poems in the public domain and out of copyright, so they must be pre-twentieth century. As always shorter works are preferred. Translations will be considered but the translation itself must be either in the public domain or the submitters own work.

Submissions for the oldies issue should contain one poem and the submitter’s statement/response. I will keep submissions open for this issue until I have 10-15 pieces at which time I will announce a publication schedule for it. Update: Oldies submissions are closed.

And, as always…

Please visit the Submissions page for more in-depth guidelines. I look forward to seeing what comes this way, and I hope you’ll send something and help spread the word. Thank you.